MSU JACK CREEK WILDLIFE SCHOLARSHIP

Each year, the Jack Creek Preserve Foundation awards one or more scholarships to a Montana State University student enrolled in natural resource conservation and management.  

Qualifications: The recipient must: 1) be a sophomore or junior enrolled in an MSU undergraduate program aimed at educating and training students for a career in natural resource conservation and management; 2) have completed at least two semesters at MSU and have a cumulative GPA of at least 3.0; 3) have a strong interest in wildlife/fisheries habitat and conservation; 4) an appreciation of the role of hunters and hunting in wildlife conversation in North America; and 5) have a commitment to a career in natural resource management.

Applications for the Jack Creek Wildlife Scholarship are available the first week of September. Decisions are made by October 1.  In 2018 Jack Creek Preserve provided 2 scholarships totaling $5,000.


2018 JACK CREEK PRESERVE WILDLIFE SCHOLARSHIP AWARDS

 jack creek preserve foundation wildlife scholarship recipient cora steinbach with Jack Creek Preserve Founder Dottie Fossel

jack creek preserve foundation wildlife scholarship recipient cora steinbach with Jack Creek Preserve Founder Dottie Fossel

 jack creek preserve foundation wildlife scholarship recipient nathaniel bowersock with Jack Creek Preserve Founder Dottie Fossel

jack creek preserve foundation wildlife scholarship recipient nathaniel bowersock with Jack Creek Preserve Founder Dottie Fossel

Cora Steinbach was awarded a $2500 scholarship to assist with her undergraduate degree in Conservation Biology at Montana State University She is a second semester junior and hopes to graduate in winter 2019. After graduating she will begin studying to take her graduate school entrance exam, so she can have the option of attending graduate school in the future. Conservation biology is a field she is very passionate about. Her primary focus is watershed ecology because of her connection to watersheds for recreation and because of the endangerment of this resource. She hopes to take a watershed research internship this upcoming summer. Cora notes that some of the leading threats to freshwater sources are: altered hydrology associated with dams, increased nutrient loading from agricultural runoff, and invasive aquatic species. Studying the effects of agriculture on watersheds is particularly important in Montana, with agriculture being pivotal to the state’s economy. Cora hopes to eventually graduate with a Master’s degree and use her expertise to help influence the decisions made in regard to Montana’s watersheds.

Nate Bowersock was awarded a $2500 scholarship to assist with his Master’s degree in Fish and Wildlife Ecology and Management at Montana State University. He is studying the population abundance of American black bears found on Yellowstone National Park’s Northern Range, by collecting hair from scent lured hair traps and naturally occurring rub trees. In addition, he is trying to identify the resources that black bears are selecting for by using a mix of GPS collars and GPS camera collars, which are collars that have cameras attached to them and record small videos across the day. He hopes to use his research to better understand the roles black bears play on the Northern Range, which could help inform National Park Service personnel about the population dynamics of this iconic animal.  Nate hopes to use his graduate degree to continue to conduct research and assist with conservation management of controversial wildlife species found in North America.


"The MSU Fish and Wildlife Management Program has an outstanding record of attracting and educating fish and wildlife biologists that are recruited into natural resource management positions throughout North America and beyond. The Jack Creek Preserve Foundation's student scholarship recognizes and supports some of our brightest and committed students and I cannot think of a more worthwhile long-term investment in conservation as each successful student will contribute to our shared mission of effective natural resource conservation and management over their 30+ year career."

ROBERT GARROTT, PH.D.   |   DEPARTMENT OF ECOLOGY, MONTANA STATE UNIVERSITY
 


SCIENCE FAIR SUPPORT

 2017 Ennis Science fair winners: FINLEY KNAPTON, EMMETT LINGLE, and TANNER INNMAN with Jack Creek Preserve founder Dottie Fossel

2017 Ennis Science fair winners: FINLEY KNAPTON, EMMETT LINGLE, and TANNER INNMAN with Jack Creek Preserve founder Dottie Fossel

The Preserve provides an incentive to encourage students in middle and high school to pursue topics like wildlife, conservation, habitat, and ecology. Each year, the Foundation awards qualifying students at Ennis and Big Sky schools with $50 to $100 prizes for exceptional projects.